Got Energy?

Got Energy? – WWR 158

Regardless of what complaint a person has when they visit their doctor, 85% of all patients complain of fatigue. It is one of the "Top 10" reasons for seeking medical help.

People feel tired. We need energy. So, where does energy come from? And, once we get energy, how do we keep it? Let me explain the process by which we produce energy and how we may form strategies to feel energetic every day.

The process of energy
First of all, there is a difference between having energy and feeling energetic. We produce a significant amount of energy even when we are asleep. Yet, most of us don't feel particularly energetic when we wake up. There are times when we may feel energetic and yet scientific tests actually measure less energy. A good example of this may be seen when a person uses a caffeine-based stimulant such as a cup of coffee or a soft drink. They may feel more alert. Yet, they have less mental energy and they typically score poorly on mental performance tests. That means they cannot really think as well and solve problems as well when they are under the influence of caffeine. More than that, the alertness that they feel comes at a high price: drinking caffeinated beverages will ensure that you feel more fatigue later. The energy that you feel is not real energy.

Metabolism
Real energy is a process of burning calories found in foods and releasing the energy contained within them. This is the process of metabolism. The word metabolism is drawn from a Greek word meaning change. Metabolism changes food into heat. Heat is a form of energy. Therefore, the first step in producing lasting energy is to eat properly so we will have enough fuel to keep our inner fires burning. Betalains, found in Nopalea, prevent these fires of metabolism from becoming fires of inflammation.

Metabolism is governed by hormones that originate in a region of your brain called the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus determines your energy needs and sends this information to your pituitary gland. The pituitary gland (often called the Master Gland) translates these signals into hormones and sends these messenger hormones on their way to other various glands. The two prominent glands for energy production are:

  • Adrenal glands – The adrenal glands respond with adrenaline when the hypothalamus detects danger. This process is often called the "fight or flight" response to stress. Adrenaline sends your body into an energy spending spree where it virtually cannibalizes your organ reserves for all of their stored energy. The fires of metabolism are turned down. Your hands and feet get cold and your core body temperature may drop below normal. Even when we are not in danger, caffeine and sugar (as well as other stimulants) mimic this process and trick your system into releasing adrenaline. The adrenaline rush is very addictive but it robs us of true energy. So, the second step in energy production is to turn down the stress response. We do this with adaptogens: plants known to help us reduce the impact of stress.
  • The thyroid – The thyroid gland is responsible for regulating your body temperature by adjusting your metabolism. Two primary fuel sources keep the thyroid gland functioning properly: Iodine and Tyrosine. Iodine is a mineral and Tyrosine is an amino acid – a building block of protein. Tyrosine is considered a non-essential amino acid because we do not need to get it in our diet. We can make it from an essential amino acid (one we must get in our diet) called Phenylalanine (LPA). However, getting Tyrosine in our diets is not a bad thing; it means that we will use less energy making Tyrosine from LPA.

    Nopalea is a good source of dietary Tyrosine and Energy Now! contains both LPA and Tyrosine to fuel healthy energy production. Energy Now! is a nutrient, not a stimulant. The ingredients in Energy Now! can help us feel energetic by supporting healthy metabolism.

Into the brain
Tyrosine and LPA fuel metabolism by supporting healthy thyroid function. Further, these important amino acids foster the sensation of energy and euphoria by serving as the building blocks for other brain chemicals, such as PEA and Nor-Epinephrine. PEA is the "hormone of love" and it is likely the reason why our energy is increased, our pain-perception reduced and even our appetite reduced when we fall in love. We want to support PEA metabolism to feel energetic! Nor-Epinephrine fuels the creation of energy in the brain and supports our nerves as we translate that energy into action.

To get energy from our brain to our body requires healthy nerves. Often, our metabolism is normal – our stress level is low and our nutrient reserves are high and still we do not feel energetic. The problem may not be as much in creating energy as it is in translating that energy through our nerves. Nerve health is supported by Vitamin B-12. People feel fatigued when they lack enough B-12 because they cannot transfer the creation of energy into the sensation of energy.

Conclusion
Health only comes from healthy habits practiced every day. Our bodies rely on nutrients and nurturing to remain healthy. Fatigue is a message from our body that something is wrong – and we need to learn to listen to our body to have energy and to feel energetic!

Take Control of Your Health

  • Practice the 10 Essentials for energy
    • Get your rest and exercise.
    • Eat a nutrient-rich diet.
    • Select relationships that energize you.
  • Support energy production with Energy Now!
  • Reduce the impact of stress with Adaptogen 10 Plus.
  • Improve the sensation of energy with Vitamin B-12.
  • Decrease the impact of inflammation with Nopalea.